Advisors Insurance Group

Your health matters to us.

We all need it.

Life moves fast and a suitable health insurance plan is vital in this day and age. Whether you're an individual, family, or a business looking to protect your employees. We will work with you to design a plan that works best for you and suits your health insurance needs. 

Individual & Families

Individual health insurance is for anyone who doesn’t have access to employer-sponsored or government-run health coverage. This includes people who are employed by a small business that doesn’t provide health benefits, people who are self-employed, and people who retire before they’re eligible for Medicare and have to get their own personal health coverage until they reach age 65.

Groups

To qualify for a group health insurance plan, your company typically needs at least two employees including the owner. In other words, a small business owner who employs just one other full-time employee typically meets the employee limit under the small business definition, and might be able to get a group plan.

Small Business

Up to 50 Employees

Midsize Business

51 to 250 Employees

Large Business

251 to 3,000+ Employees

Types Of Plan's

HMO
Health Maintenance Organization

An HMO delivers all health services through a network of healthcare providers and facilities. With an HMO, you may have:

  • The least freedom to choose your health care providers
  • The least amount of paperwork compared to other plans
  • A primary care doctor to manage your care and refer you to specialists when you need one so the care is covered by the health plan; most HMOs will require a referral before you can see a specialist.
  • Premium: This is the cost you pay each month for insurance.
  • Deductible: Your plan may require you to pay the amount before it covers care except for preventive care.
  • Copays and/or co-insurance for each type of care. A copay is a flat fee, such as $15, that you pay when you get care. Coinsurance is when you pay a percent of the charges for care, for example 20%. These charges vary according to your plan and they are counted toward your deductible.

PPO
Preferred Provider Organization

With a PPO, you may have:

  •  A moderate amount of freedom to choose your health care providers — more than an HMO; you do not have to get a referral from a primary care doctor to see a specialist.
  • Higher out-of-pocket costs if you see out-of-network doctors vs. in-network providers
  • More paperwork than with other plans if you see out-of-network providers
  • Premium: This is the cost you pay each month for insurance.
  • Deductible: Some PPOs may have a deductible. You will likely have to pay a higher deductible if you see an out-of-network doctor.
  • Copay or coinsurance: A copay is a flat fee, such as $15, that you pay when you get care. Coinsurance is when you pay a percent of the charges for care, for example 20%.
  • Other costs: If your out-of-network doctor charges more than others in the area do, you may have to pay the balance after your insurance pays its share.

EPO
Exclusive Provider Organization

With an EPO, you may have: A moderate amount of freedom to choose your health care providers — more than an HMO; you do not have to get a referral from a primary care doctor to see a specialist. No coverage for out-of-network providers; if you see a provider that is not in your plan’s network – other than in an emergency – you will have to pay the full cost yourself. Lower premium than a PPO offered by the same insurer.

  • Premium: This is the cost you pay each month for insurance.
  • Deductible: Some EPOs may have a deductible.
  • Copay or coinsurance: A copay is a flat fee, such as $15, that you pay when you get care. Coinsurance is when you pay a percent of the charges for care, for example 20%.
  • Other costs: If you see an out-of-network provider you will have to pay the full bill.

POS
Point of Service Plan

A POS plan blends features of an HMO with a PPO. With POS plan, you may have:

  • More freedom to choose your health care providers than you would in an HMO
  • A moderate amount of paperwork if you see out-of-network providers
  • A primary care doctor who coordinates your care and who refers you to specialists
  • Premium: This is the cost you pay each month for insurance.
  • Deductible: Your plan may require you to pay the amount of a deductible before it covers care beyond preventive services.You may pay a higher deductible if you see an out-of-network provider.
  • Copays or coinsurance: You will pay either a copay, such as $15, when you get care or coinsurance, which is a percent of the charges for care. Copayments and coinsurance are higher when you use an out-of-network doctor.

HDHP
High Deductible Health Plan

With a high-deductible health plan (HDHP). With an HDHP, you may have:

  • One of these types of health plans: HMO, PPO, EPO, or POS
  • Higher out-of-pocket costs than many types of plans; like other plans, if you reach the maximum out-of-pocket amount, the plan pays 100% of your care.
  • A health savings account (HSA) to help pay for your care; the money you put in an HSA is not taxed and can be used tax-free on eligible medical expenses. In order to have a HSA, you must be enrolled in a HDHP.
  • Premium: An HDHP generally has a lower premium compared to other plans.
  • Deductible: The deductible is at least $1,400 for an individual or $2,800 for a family, but not more than $6,900 for an individual and $13,800 for a family in 2020. Like with all plans, your preventive care is free even if you haven’t met the deductible. 
  • Copays or coinsurance:  Other than preventive care, you must  pay all your costs up to your deductible when you go for medical care. You can use money in your HSA to pay these costs.

HSA
Health Savings Account

  • A health savings account (HSA) to help pay for your care; the money you put in an HSA is not taxed and can be used tax-free on eligible medical expenses. In order to have a HSA, you must be enrolled in a HDHP.

Comprehensive Health Insurance Solutions

We understand the importance of your health insurance plan and determining what the best options are. That is why each Adviisors agent will advise you every step of the way throughout the process. Our agents will continue to work with you to manage your on going needs and offer insight to you and your employees moving forward.

Your health matters to us.

We all need it.

Life moves fast and a suitable health insurance plan is vital in this day and age. Whether you're an individual, family, or business looking for health insurance, we can provide you with multiple options to suit your health insurance needs. 

Individual & Families

Individual health insurance is for anyone who doesn’t have access to employer-sponsored or government-run health coverage. This includes people who are employed by a small business that doesn’t provide health benefits, people who are self-employed, and people who retire before they’re eligible for Medicare and have to get their own personal health coverage until they reach age 65.

Groups

To qualify for a group health insurance plan, your company typically needs at least two employees including the owner. In other words, a small business owner who employs just one other full-time employee typically meets the employee limit under the small business definition, and might be able to get a group plan.

Medicare & Supplemental

Once you are 65 or older you can enroll in Medicare Part A & B. Once enrolled in a Medicare Part B plan, you can get a Medicare Supplement insurance policy. Medicare Supplement plans are also available to you if you’re younger than age 65 and eligible for Medicare due to disability.

Types Of Plan's

HMO

(Health Maintenance Organization)
An HMO delivers all health services through a network of healthcare providers and facilities. With an HMO, you may have: The least freedom to choose your health care providers. The least amount of paperwork compared to other plans. A primary care doctor to manage your care and refer you to specialists when you need one so the care is covered by the health plan; most HMOs will require a referral before you can see a specialist.

PPO

(Preferred Provider Organization)
With a PPO, you may have: A moderate amount of freedom to choose your health care providers -- more than an HMO; you do not have to get a referral from a primary care doctor to see a specialist. Higher out-of-pocket costs if you see out-of-network doctors vs. in-network providers. More paperwork than with other plans if you see out-of-network providers.

POS

(Point of Service)
A POS plan blends features of an HMO with a PPO. With POS plan, you may have: More freedom to choose your health care providers than you would in an HMO. A moderate amount of paperwork if you see out-of-network providers. A primary care doctor who coordinates your care and who refers you to specialists.

EPO

(Exclusive Provider Organization)
With an EPO, you may have: A moderate amount of freedom to choose your health care providers -- more than an HMO; you do not have to get a referral from a primary care doctor to see a specialist. No coverage for out-of-network providers; if you see a provider that is not in your plan’s network – other than in an emergency – you will have to pay the full cost yourself. Lower premium than a PPO offered by the same insurer.

HDHP

(High Deductible Plan)
With an HDHP, you may have: One of these types of health plans: HMO, PPO, EPO, or POS. Higher out-of-pocket costs than many types of plans; like other plans, if you reach the maximum out-of-pocket amount, the plan pays 100% of your care. Many bronze plans may qualify as HDHPs depending on the deductible.

HSA

(Health Savings Account)
The only way to get access to a health savings account is you must first be enrolled in a high deductible health plan. A health savings account (HSA) to help pay for your care; the money you put in an HSA is not taxed and can be used tax-free on eligible medical expenses.

Comprehensive Health Insurance Solutions

We understand the importance of your health insurance plan and determining what the best options are. That is why each Adviisors agent will advise you every step of the way throughout the process. Our agents will continue to work with you to manage your on going needs and offer insight to you and your employees moving forward.

Medicare & Supplemental

Once you are 65 or older you can enroll in Medicare Part A & B. Once enrolled in a Medicare Part B plan, you can get a Medicare Supplement insurance policy. Medicare Supplement plans are also available to you if you’re younger than age 65 and eligible for Medicare due to disability.